3-D Printing Lab: Inventors and Mad-Scientists Wanted

Michael Kluger - RCC 3D Lab explains the process of printing 3D production and manufacturing  photo credit:  RV

Michael Kluger – RCC 3D Lab explains the process of printing 3D production and manufacturing
photo credit: RV

3D Printing is the latest cutting edge technology blazing a path to the future of manufacturing around the world.  In the Village of Haverstraw at the Rockland Community College building there is a 3D Printing Lab on the second floor.  This quiet village nestled near the Hudson River is the secret place where future inventors, aspiring entrepreneurs and the imagination driven mad-scientists converge to create the next newest thing to explode on the free market.

Mr. Michael Kluger, Assistant to the Director, Haverstraw Extension Center, Coordinator of 3D Smart Lab said;  “The 3D Lab is the crown Jewel of RCC economic development tools, it is the place for inventors to come and build their ideas.”

Mr. John Tirelli, a tall, wild-eyed enthusiast explained in an amusing logical Star Trek Mr. Spock tone; “The idea goes from my brain, to the computer, to reality.”  Mr. Tirelli’s business card reads, Rock Solid IT, Engineering Higher Standards,  John Tirelli, Owner/President, Inventor.   Mr. Tirelli, along with Mr. Kluger helped over a dozen entrepreneur start-ups with their businesses.

Msrs. Kluger, Todd Madry, and John Tirelli inspect a newly printed Spanish Galley Ship photo credit:  RV

Mr.  Kluger,  Security Officer Todd Madry, and Mr. John Tirelli inspect a newly printed Spanish Galley Ship
photo credit: RV

Mr. Kluger related how Mr. Thomas P. Della Torre, Associate Vice President of Academic & Community Partnerships, RCC was a driving force in establishing the 3D Lab.  He helped acquire the funding, sponsorship, grants and keeps it going.  The goal is to help each entrepreneur succeed.  This RCC 3D Lab boasts a quarter of a million dollars invested in computers, materials and some of the best 3D Printing technology found on the market.

A freshly 3D Printed Spanish Galley Ship   photo credit:  RV

A freshly 3D Printed Spanish Galley Ship
photo credit: RV

If you can imagine it, the 3D printer can produce it

Mr. Kluger added confidently; “This is how you can get a high-tech job without a high tech degree.” The applications for every industry are endless and far-reaching.  The potential for boundless job growth, career expansion and new frontiers are explained with infectious enthusiasm by Mr. Kluger; “This opens a new world of choices for students, as well as, up and coming new business models for every industry.”    

The potential applications range from manufacturing to engineering, product designs to functional prototypes created by Computer Aided Design software [CAD].  For instance, in the medical field 3D printers can manufacture a facsimile of organs for study printed from a  3D MRI image.  Imagine a time where organs like hearts can be “printed” out by a 3D printer in minutes ready for transplant or study.

Ms. Yamiler Nunez, RCC Student aspiring RN ponders the next generation of 3D printed human organs or limbs photo credit:  RV

Ms. Yamiler Nunez, RCC Student aspiring RN ponders the next generation of 3D printed human organs or limbs
photo credit: RV

Yamiler Nunez, an 18 year old student working towards a career in Nursing toured the lab in wide-eyed fascination over the prospects that this technology may one day be used to print out prosthetic limbs, organs, or even dentures in the very near future. “This is amazing.  I can imagine how many ways this can be used;” she told Rockland Voice.

Anthony Vega, an  18 year old student working towards a career in law enforcement, reacted enthusiastically to the prospects this technology may have in his field as an investigator or forensics specialist to help reconstruct a crime scene or ballistic testing.

Carlos Lopez, an 18 year old student aspirant as an electrician’s apprentice imagined the applications of customized cabling printed out on materials that would be natural conductors of electrons.

Msrs.  Tirelli and Kluger, Ms. Nunez, Msrs. Vega and Lopez examine 3D printed items and imagine their future applications in their field of study photo credit:  RV

Msrs. Tirelli and Kluger, Ms. Nunez, Msrs. Vega and Lopez examine 3D printed items and imagine their future applications in their field of study
photo credit: RV

Mr. Kluger and Mr. Tirelli explained to the students that the major skill sets future 3D Printing Inventors will need are unlimited imagination, basic computer data input, rudimentary art, functional math, and ultimately design engineering. “Kids need to learn how to digitally draw in 3 dimensions.  If they know how to do that, they will create a career for themselves, because the demand for those skills will soon explode.”

Mr. Francisco Oralles, Assistant Principal, North Rockland High School shepherded his students up to the second floor for this interview because; “they need to experience ideas, new horizons,  awakened in their minds,  so they understand that the future is within their reach.”

Mr. Franciso Oralles, Assistant Principal, North Rockland High School

Mr. Franciso Oralles, Assistant Principal, North Rockland High School

Mr. Tirelli created a work study job for himself there by helping others build their businesses.  Clients visit the lab with an idea or project and he helps them turn it into a 3D printed reality.   These services are free of charge to New Yorkers under this grant program.  The public is invited to call or visit for a presentation.

Early in the 20th Century, the Village of Haverstraw was one of the premier brick manufacturing hubs on the East Coast.  Most of New York’s early skyscrapers were built with bricks made there and ferried down the Hudson.   Today, this small lab is where inventors and mad-scientists conspire to create the next big thing that will revolutionize every industry.  The innovations born from their imagination can transform the Hudson Valley into a high-tech bonanza for entrepreneurs, visionaries and inventors harboring endless ideas, vitality and the sheer will to make it happen deep into the 21st Century.

“This is the sandbox where young, aspiring Einstein’s, Franklin’s, and Edison’s come to play;”  Mr. Kluger quipped with a boyish smile and confident glint in his eye.  Mr. Tirelli quietly looming over the next generation of products on the clean up table, nodded with a broad grin of approval.

For more information contact:  Mr. Michael Kluger:  845 786-5340 email: mkluger@sunyrockland.edu  Mr. Thomas P. Della Torre: 845 574-4465 email: tdellato@sunyrockland.edu  Mr. John Tirelli: 845 699-3212  email: john.Tirelli@gmail.com 

 

 

 

 

 

About Anthony Mele

Tony Melé, MA, Diplomacy, International Conflict Management, BS, International Relations and Counterterrorism, is a Federal Firearms Licensee, New York Gun Dealer, and is a Defense Trade Broker licensed by the US Department of State, Office for Political-Military Affairs for International Traffic and Arms Regulations. He is U.S. Army Veteran. Mr. Melé is a Knight Templar, The Sovereign Military Order of the Temple of Jerusalem - Priory of St. Patrick. **DISCLAIMER: The Opinions published on the ROCKLAND VOICE are that of each author and in no way represent the the views or perspectives of the SMOTJ / OSMTH**

About the Author
Tony Melé, MA, Diplomacy, International Conflict Management, BS, International Relations and Counterterrorism, is a Federal Firearms Licensee, New York Gun Dealer, and is a Defense Trade Broker licensed by the US Department of State, Office for Political-Military Affairs for International Traffic and Arms Regulations. He is U.S. Army Veteran. Mr. Melé is a Knight Templar, The Sovereign Military Order of the Temple of Jerusalem - Priory of St. Patrick. **DISCLAIMER: The Opinions published on the ROCKLAND VOICE are that of each author and in no way represent the the views or perspectives of the SMOTJ / OSMTH**

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